Perfume

So, this is almost the end of National Chemistry Week – aside from pumpkins, it’s pretty much been our focus of the week.

Perfume.  Apparently the first chemist in history was a woman in Mesopotamia who in the 2nd millennium BC started a filtration process with flowers and oils and other things to make perfume.

The more I read about the chemistry of perfume, the more my head spun, so we were not going to try to make it. Instead, we got some free samples in the mail and decided to do some smell tests to see if they lived up to their claims.

In other words, silliness.

Mike and Katarina beat Sam and Anabelle home. So I started with one that was designed for men.  The ad would have you believe that women would swoon for any man wearing this particular scent.

Mike put it on.

Kat and I both agreed he smelled like a hotel bathroom that had just been cleaned and needed to go change his shirt.

Another scent claimed that the wearer would be seen as unresistably feminine with a hint of floral.

I put it on.

Katarina screeched, “Oh my gosh! You smell like an old church bathroom!  Not good!”

Mike agreed.

Sam and Anabelle walked in.  Anabelle froze. “Something smells unusual.”

We burst out laughing, and agreed to chase the smell out by baking cookies.

For older kids:  If you want some more chemistry that fits with the national theme of behind the movie scenes, Steve Spangler just released a how to make blood science video and recipes. It’s intended for teens who want to do the vampire thing, but if your kids want to know how movies do the blood thing, this will take the mystery out of it. I didn’t post the video because I’m too squeamish.

1 comment to Perfume

  • You know, when my brother, cousins, and I were kids and we tried various ways to capture the smells from flowers, we never thought we might be acting as chemists. It’s amazing how kids will learn if they are just given the chance, and this post is an excellent example of that.

Leave a Reply

 

 

 

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>