Why Children (and you) Should Write Authors

When an adult reads a book they love they often tell people about it or write an online review. Often that online review gets back to the author. But when kids read a book they love, they often don’t do either.

A few years back, my daughter and I did a book club. Our first read? The Mother-Daughter Book Club. Fitting, right? My daughter loved it and wanted to check out the author’s website. Most authors have a site and usually a contact page/email. After writing her thoughts, my daughter was delighted when the author immediately responded.

The author thanked Kat for the encouragement to keep writing at a time when she was feeling discouraged. Now, there are six books in the series! We’re not saying my daughter can take credit for the successful series, but we like to think it. (;

Now my son has guest-posted here a few times about another series, The Strange Case of Origami Yoda. He liked it so much he made a Halloween costume out of it:

He went to the author’s website and found out the author was having costume contest.  What luck!  An email later, and my son got a personal response from the author.  The author liked his costume so much that in return he was going to illustrate Sam wearing it.  A few weeks later, we got this in the mail:

It cracked us up! Not to mention that Sam is now likely to be a forever fan of whatever the author does.

So if your kids got books for Christmas or from the library,  check out the author together! Sure, some authors don’t respond, but in general it’s a win-win.  Writers are encouraged to keep writing, and readers encouraged to keep reading.  Perfect activity for holiday break.

Happy Reading!

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